• Home
  • Blog
  • Congratulations you have reached hand over stage – What’s Next?
Congratulations you have reached or are almost at handover stage with your
new home.

What steps do you need to take to finish the surface drainage needs around your property?

You may be close to reaching or have reached handover stage – now is the time for you to finish the exterior of the home with drainage, driveways, decking and landscaping. So where do you begin? It can be a daunting task especially if this is the first time you have owned a home. Try following these tips to get you on track to finishing and enjoying your new home sooner.

Homeowner

  1. As a new homeowner begin by asking the builder who constructed the home to help you identify any potential surfacewater issues closer to handover or at handover stage.
  2. Research water flow issues and arm yourself with a list of questions.
  3. Engage the services of a plumber, concreter and if required a landscaper. Building from the initial issues identified at handover discuss with the
    1. plumber, 2. concreter and 3. landscaper further surfacewater issues. Develop and map out where the excess water and surface run off will potentially cause issues around the home. Your goal is to  Catch, Move, and Release the water in to the appropriate storm water catchment.
  4. The plumber and concreter will work together to set drains to the correct height.
  5.  If you are landscaping choose materials and plants that promote good drainage around the home. Avoid planting trees or shrubs with extensive root systems too close to the foundation, as they can cause damage to underground drainage pipes.
  6. Planning and preparing at the beginning can potentially help safeguard you from damaging water build up costly repairs and headaches down the track.

Plumber

  1. From a plumber’s perspective – drainage will be the first thing completed on site. Once surface drainage points have been identified they will get to work adding drains, pits, ag-pipes to the property.
  2. Discuss any hardscaped areas such as concreted surface areas or paved areas to ensure the correct drainage system are implemented. Remember water needs to be directed away from your house.
  3. Ask the plumber or concreter to tape over grates once installed prior to concreting to protect the grates.

Concreter

  1. Building on from the plumber, a concreter sets the levels for heights, edge boards and adequate falls to prevent water from getting to the property.
  2. If the home sits lower than the street level a concreter may suggest creating a dish in the concrete – so water can be forced back into the installed drain.
  3. The concreter will begin by marking out the perimeter, then proceed to dig out the topsoil and level the driveway. After that, they will add the sub-base and formwork before pouring the concrete.

Once poured, the concrete area will have a series of contraction joints cut in, this will minimise any cracking. All formwork will also be removed.

This is followed with a non-slip finish if required, and then left to cure (generally 7-10 days walking, full cure 28 days, park a car). This process will also be used for concreted side paths and if any concrete is added to the back of the property.

Landscaper – optional

  1. To create a beautiful, functional, and more importantly well drained living space, a landscaper will evaluate the work site. This includes conducting soil analysis to determine drainage needs and sunlight exposure.
  2. They will help guide, design, and execute a plan for plant and tree placement, features, walkways, decking, paving and if required retaining walls.

All three of these contractors will play a crucial role to help beautify and more importantly protect your home from surfacewater drainage issues. Working hand-in hand they will be able to easily Catch, Move and Release water from your new home.

RECENT POSTS

Is pooling water around your home a problem? Here is how you can fix it!

We all know rain; especially prolonged rain events can lead a variety of problems around your home. We can help you with pooling and drainage issues especially in your yard! Where you may not have previously had a pooling or drainage problem in the past, recent rain events may have…

The most requested Agricultural most frequently asked questions

We get asked a lot of questions about our agricultural products. We have compiled a list of our most frequently asked questions about all our agriculture products.

Enter your email to receive instructions
on how to reset your password.

CLASS LOADING TABLE

Class Loading Typical Use Nominal Wheel Loading kg Serviceability Design Load kN Ultimate Limit State Design Load kN
icon RESIDENTIAL Non-rated usage. Designed for residential applications such as pathways and driveways. N/A N/A N/A
icon CLASS Areas (including paths) accessible only to pedestrians and pedal cyclists and closed to other traffic. 330 6.7 10
icon CLASS Areas (including paths and light tractor paths) accessible to vehicles (excl. commercial vehicles) or livestock. 2670 53 80
icon CLASS Malls and areas open to slow moving commercial vehicles. 5000 100 150
icon CLASS Carriageways of roads and areas open to commercial vehicles. 8000 140 210
icon CLASS General docks and aircraft pavements. 13 700 267 400
icon CLASS Docks and aircraft pavements subject to high wheel loads. 20 000 400 600
icon CLASS Docks and aircraft pavements subject to very high wheel loads. 30 000 600 900

RESIDENTIAL

  • Non-rated usage. Designed for residential applications such as pathways and driveways.
  • Nominal Wheel Loading (kg)

    N/A

  • Nominal Wheel Loading (kg)

    N/A

  • Nominal Wheel Loading (kg)

    N/A

CLASS

  • Areas (including paths) accessible only to pedestrians and pedal cyclists and closed to other traffic.
  • Nominal Wheel Loading (kg)

    330

  • Nominal Wheel Loading (kg)

    6.7

  • Nominal Wheel Loading (kg)

    10

CLASS

  • Areas (including paths and light tractor paths) accessible to vehicles (excl. commercial vehicles) or livestock.
  • Nominal Wheel Loading (kg)

    2670

  • Nominal Wheel Loading (kg)

    53

  • Nominal Wheel Loading (kg)

    80

CLASS

  • Malls and areas open to slow moving commercial vehicles.
  • Nominal Wheel Loading (kg)

    5000

  • Nominal Wheel Loading (kg)

    100

  • Nominal Wheel Loading (kg)

    150

CLASS

  • Carriageways of roads and areas open to commercial vehicles.
  • Nominal Wheel Loading (kg)

    8000

  • Nominal Wheel Loading (kg)

    140

  • Nominal Wheel Loading (kg)

    210

CLASS

  • General docks and aircraft pavements.
  • Nominal Wheel Loading (kg)

    13,700

  • Nominal Wheel Loading (kg)

    267

  • Nominal Wheel Loading (kg)

    400

CLASS

  • Docks and aircraft pavements subject to high wheel loads.
  • Nominal Wheel Loading (kg)

    20,000

  • Nominal Wheel Loading (kg)

    400

  • Nominal Wheel Loading (kg)

    600

CLASS

  • Docks and aircraft pavements subject to very high wheel loads.
  • Nominal Wheel Loading (kg)

    30,000

  • Nominal Wheel Loading (kg)

    600

  • Nominal Wheel Loading (kg)

    900